Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Chosing the Right Wines for Your Easter Feast

Pick the right wine for your Easter Feast

California’s Central Coast is bursting with beauty, the spring landscape a feast for the eyes. A glance of the calendar—or a walk down any candy aisle—serves as a quick reminder that Easter is just days away. For members of The Paso Robles Wine Club, you might have a bottle or two set aside for the holiday feast—but, if you’re in need of suggestions of the best wines to pair with your Easter Feast, read on…

The Easter menu can vary widely, depending on family tradition and how many guests you’re planning to serve.

Here are 3 of the more popular options and wines to fit each menu:

Baked Ham: A traditional on the Easter menu, ham comes in many variations from the salty smoked country hams to the more mild and definitely sweeter honey baked hams. No matter the glaze—often tropical or peachy—the main flavor profile of ham is salt. The best way to balance the saltiness is by selecting a fruit forward wine. Chose a fruity Paso Robles Zinfandel or a Pinot to bring out the best in your holiday ham.

Leg or Lamb: Lamb, whether a sizeable leg, roasted in a hot oven, or a rack—perfect for two--coated in bread crumbs and carefully roasted to perfection, often has a starring role on the Easter menu—especially on California’s Central Coast where there’s such a high availability of local lamb. With a characteristic gaminess and earthy profile, lamb is best served with a Paso Robles Cabernet or Zinfandel rich with black fruit—blueberries, blackberries, plum—and the sweetness of violets and rose. For the best match, choose a wine with a little gaminess—a perfect match for the wild and herbaceous flavors of lamb.

Easter Brunch: Always a popular springtime option, an Easter Brunch can be formal or casual and can offer everything from the traditional ham to a mix of seafood, from plump shrimp to delicate salmon. Trying to find the right wine to suite every item—and every palate—is nearly impossible, so the best option is to choose a Paso Robles Rosé. Many people mistakenly think that all Rosés taste the same, but since they’re made from a variety of grapes, they vary in both flavor and profile. Try to select one that will nicely match the majority of your brunch items, such a sweet Zinfandel Rosé, a floral Mourvèdre Rosé, a fruity Sangiovese Rosé or a savory Tempranillo Rosé.

A rite of spring and a most enjoyable affair, the Easter Feast is perfect for trying a new wine, something that members of The Paso Robles Wine Club enjoy throughout the year when they receive their regular shipments of Paso Robles boutique and unique wines, which always includes something to share with family and friends for a special occasions.



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